With each subsequent relapse, the chance for recovery diminishes

The development of psychotic symptoms marks the formal onset of first-episode psychosis (FEP) in schizophrenia.1 Although most patients can achieve symptom remission after FEP, less than half will regain previous levels of functioning and only approximately 25% may achieve a full recovery, defined by both clinical and symptomatic remission together with improved occupational and psychosocial function.2-4 These numbers will improve with uninterrupted pharmacologic and psychosocial intervention; however, many patients experience a cycle of relapse, treatment failure, and incomplete recovery—leading to debilitating clinical deterioration.1

SEE THE CLINICAL EFFECTS OF RELAPSE

82% Poppins-BoldOF PATIENTS WILLRELAPSE WITHIN5 YEARS OF FEP8 LONGER TIME TO REMISSION FROM FIRST TO THIRD RELAPSE10 6x 14% OF PATIENTS NO LONGER RESPOND TO THE SAME TREATMENT FOLLOWING A SINGLE RELAPSE9 Click the plus signs to see the data.
-20 -30 Week 8/9 Week 12/13 Week 16/17 Week 20/21 Week 24/25 Week 28/29 Week 32 0 20 10 -10 Mean Change From Baseline Total PANSS Score Pre-relapse Treatment Phase Post-relapse Treatment Phase Worsening symptoms +7.0 -18.2 Improved symptoms A 25.2-POINT DIFFERENTIAL WAS OBSERVED AT WEEK 32 POST- RELAPSE VS PRE-RELAPSE 9 0 20 40 60 80 Years After Recovery From First Psychotic Episode Cumulative Relapse Rate (%) 1 2 3 4 5 81.9% 74.7% 63.1% 53.7% 16.2% 82% OF PATIENTS WILL RELAPSE WITHIN 5 YEARS OF FEP 0 15 20 10 5 25 30 Schizophrenia Relapse Number 3 rd Relapse 1st Relapse 2nd Relapse Weeks 7 weeks 24 weeks 4 weeks 6X LONGER TIME TO REMISSION FROM FIRST TO THIRD RELAPSE 7 weeks

Relapse accelerates illness progression, making it harder and harder to improve outcomes over time4-7

Schizophrenia progresses due to the clinical interconnectivity of 3 key outcomes: cumulative relapse rate, time to remission, and treatment response. After the first psychotic episode, the cumulative rate of relapse continues to rise, remission takes longer to achieve, and treatment responsiveness begins to diminish with each subsequent relapse.4,5,8-10

Early, uninterrupted pharmacologic intervention is critical for improving clinical outcomes. It is a proven first step in schizophrenia management.2,4,7

Hear more on relapse from experts

On Relapse

Dr. Mary Moller and Dr. Irene Hurford explain how relapse is defined and discuss their approach to destigmatizing schizophrenia relapse, so patients are not ashamed to report symptoms early.

Teva is committed to providing education and enhancing care for everyone living with schizophrenia.

The SCZ Now initiative was created to help support this educational effort.